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richives

Posted 21 August 2018 - 03:53 PM

For 2019 the NCAA has changed its pitching rule foot positioning to match FED. 

 

So if you are 19 and playing pro you are smart enough to deal with the foot positioning but college students aren't. 


awu

Posted 12 August 2018 - 06:33 PM

Thank you gentlemen much obliged.
I suppose my old school self was defining one step backwards as something that is shown in these videos.


richives

Posted 11 August 2018 - 08:39 PM

What if the pitchers first step is in location marked on picture? https://postimg.cc/image/dvqtqv7t9/  Similar to this video

 

Legal in OBR (and LL) and NCAA.


awu

Posted 11 August 2018 - 06:25 PM

What if the pitchers first step is in location marked on picture? https://postimg.cc/image/dvqtqv7t9/  Similar to this video


richives

Posted 11 August 2018 - 03:09 PM

I guess it depends on what "backward" means. You want him to step "back behind the rubber" but it does not state that. But if the pitcher's body is slightly to the side then he would be stepping sideways and not backwards. I think the rule is clear.


You are adding something that isn't there.

His foot went behind his body. That's backwards.

And the rule says "may".
He doesn't even have to make that first step.

Ron

Posted 10 August 2018 - 08:22 PM

I guess it depends on what  "backward" means.  You want him to step "back behind the rubber" but it does not state that.  But if the pitcher's body is slightly to the side then he would be stepping sideways and not backwards.  I think the rule is clear.

 

I've seen all types of kids pitching and try to correct some of the blatant problems early.  However, the video shows a player using a really good style because it is "legal" and because it has very limited movement.  I've seen some kids take huge awkward steps and then can't get their body back into position.

 

I also was against one player who had a style similar to Clayton Kershaw with the little downward step that didn't touch the ground. (see video if I can attach it)  The problem was, every now and then his foot touched the ground because he lost his balance.  I argued it was an illegal pitch over and over to no avail.

 


richives

Posted 10 August 2018 - 07:49 PM

Thanks Rich appreciate your reply it explains a lot.  LL may need to clarify their rule as it is misleading the way it is stated :

 

"pitcher may take one step backward and one step forward with the free foot"

 

The way it reads will absolutely cause some confusion if like you stated the free foot is unrestricted in where it is placed on initial step.  We assumed free foot definition was the foot that was free from contact with the rubber not free to place anywhere the pitcher wants to put it.

 

What is misleading about it? It's exactly what the pitcher in the video did. 

 

What led you to add your own definition of "free"?

 

It's the same as the pro rule that has been around for over a century.


awu

Posted 10 August 2018 - 06:29 PM

Thanks Rich appreciate your reply it explains a lot.  LL may need to clarify their rule as it is misleading the way it is stated :

 

"pitcher may take one step backward and one step forward with the free foot"

 

The way it reads will absolutely cause some confusion if like you stated the free foot is unrestricted in where it is placed on initial step.  We assumed free foot definition was the foot that was free from contact with the rubber not free to place anywhere the pitcher wants to put it.


richives

Posted 09 August 2018 - 09:04 PM

I'm thinking the pitcher has to either step behind or to the side of the rubber with his free foot as shown in the graphics on this page, http://www.umpirebib...ching-positions

 

This answer is for LL and OBR.

 

The free foot is the free foot because it is free of restrictions.   Free to be anywhere the pitcher wants to put it. That's why it's called free. The action shown is legal.

 

Be aware that there are different rule sets and different rules. The three main ones are

 

1) The Official Rules of Baseball (OBR) which are used by pros and adopted by most youth organizations including Little League. 

 

2) The high school rules (NFHS or FED)  used in all states (exept MA which uses OBR).

 

3) NCAA rules used by NCAA, Jr Colleges, and NAIA.

 

FED and NCAA have different requirements for some aspects.

 

The rule referenced in the video you posted only applies to FED. NCAA is the same as OBR for foot positioning.


awu

Posted 09 August 2018 - 04:24 PM

I'm thinking the pitcher has to either step behind or to the side of the rubber with his free foot as shown in the graphics on this page, http://www.umpirebib...ching-positions

 

 

 

 


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