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Youth Arm Injuries - Anyone Surprised ???


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#1 Lou Barbieri

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 11:18 PM

An increase in youth BB arm injuries/surgeries - anyone surprised?

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#2 richives

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 04:13 AM

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#3 Lou Barbieri

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 03:57 PM

Better late than never !!!

#4 Ron

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 05:28 PM

I have not seen a lot of injuries at the Majors and below.  This is my first time in Juniors and I am seeing 3 boys with sore arms including my son.

 

My son (13) after playing 8 years of LL, including 2 years of travel ball at the same time, started complaining a month ago of a sore elbow.  He is primarily pitcher/catcher/SS.  I immediately went on protection mode.  Sat out for a couple of weeks.  No throwing. Rehab and medication.  Started him back throwing and got him back in the game as 1B so he could have minimal throwing. 

 

After another week things looked good and he went in as a relief pitcher.  After one inning he was starting to get sore again.  We are taking this seriously as the Tournament season is about to start.

 

This is the first year I am not his Manager, and his first year at a 60-90 field in Juniors.  I don't have total control over what is going on with assignments but luckily the Manager does listen to me because I speak from being an injured youth baseball pitcher that was overworked.  I am not letting him play pitcher or catcher. 

 

My hope is that his body is simply needing to adjust to the larger field, and needing to tweak his mechanics.



#5 amutz

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 08:11 PM

Observations/lessons from our league and travel:  the strongest athletes (who pitch) are at highest risk for arm use injury.  Many of the injuries happen as kids begin to get big and strong because their muscles can overwhelm their bones/growth plates.   The ortho my son saw said she would prefer that kids don't pitch at all until their growth plates seal (usually around 15-16yo).    Mechanics and uneven muscle balance are other factors.    For example muscles for decelerating the arm need to be strong to avoid stressing the elbow.   But even great mechanics and conditioning won't prevent injury to growth plates.     Time off, Physical therapy, and smart conditioning are needed.  

 

Counter to intuition, a small 12 may be able to pitch more without injury than a big 13yo.     As a parent I'd say get expert diagnosis and if there is growth plate or bone involvement its time to take a break from baseball.  


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#6 Ron

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 04:44 PM

Excellent observations amutz.
I have never thought of it that way.
Muscles needing to be strong for deceleration to prevent stressing the elbow may be a factor in my son's elbow being sore.
Thank you for the input.

#7 Plesh

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 01:48 PM

Deceleration is rarely thought about, but it is a huge factor in arm health.

 

External rotation of the arm is the fastest motion a human can create. Think about how much stress is put on an arm that is going from max velocity to 0. It's why we emphasize following through and swinging the arm down, forcing the arm to decelerate over a longer distance/ time. Improper decelerating can take its toll quickly.


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#8 rsnyder6

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 05:42 AM

The surgeon who speaks at our safety meeting every year always makes the point that the best pitchers are usually at the most risk.

One reason is they are pitched more often, another is they are often the stronger kids that throw harder.

(The Dr came up through our league and is a great resource for us. He also has done work with Dr Andrews and Motus.)



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